Category Archives: Architecture

607. Curaçao’s Swinging Old Lady

Paris has the Eiffel Tower. New York has the Brooklyn Bridge. The Statue of Liberty. The Empire State Building. Beijing has the Great Wall. Cusco has the Machu Picchu. Agra has the Taj Mahal. San Francisco has the Golden Gate.

607. Curaçao’s Swinging Old Lady

Paris has the Eiffel Tower. New York has the Brooklyn Bridge. The Statue of Liberty. The Empire State Building. Beijing has the Great Wall. Cusco has the Machu Picchu. Agra has the Taj Mahal. San Francisco has the Golden Gate.

627. Amsterdam in the Tropics

Consider a street in Amsterdam with narrow three-and-four-story buildings topped with gabled roofs and baroque sculpted curlicues. Now paint them in a rainbow of luscious tropical colors, add galleries with shuttered arches, and transplant the whole strip into the Caribbean.

627. Amsterdam in the Tropics

Consider a street in Amsterdam with narrow three-and-four-story buildings topped with gabled roofs and baroque sculpted curlicues. Now paint them in a rainbow of luscious tropical colors, add galleries with shuttered arches, and transplant the whole strip into the Caribbean.

677. Curaçao’s Sephardic Sand Floor

A visit to Curaçao’s majestic Mikvé Israel-Emanuel (“The Hope of Israel”) should be on many bucket lists. Built in 1732 as a tropical replica of the Esnoga (Amsterdam’s oldest synagogue, 1670/71) congregants’ ancestry dates back to 1651 when the first Portuguese Sephardic Jews settled

677. Curaçao’s Sephardic Sand Floor

A visit to Curaçao’s majestic Mikvé Israel-Emanuel (“The Hope of Israel”) should be on many bucket lists. Built in 1732 as a tropical replica of the Esnoga (Amsterdam’s oldest synagogue, 1670/71) congregants’ ancestry dates back to 1651 when the first Portuguese Sephardic Jews settled

704. Catholic Churches of Curaçao

This majestic photo of Misa di Willibrordus by awesome photographer Brett Russel popped up in my Instagram feed today and created an immediate pang of homesickness… while jauntily crossing 14th Street in Manhattan (clutching my iPhone, of course). Funny thing is I’m actually not

704. Catholic Churches of Curaçao

This majestic photo of Misa di Willibrordus by awesome photographer Brett Russel popped up in my Instagram feed today and created an immediate pang of homesickness… while jauntily crossing 14th Street in Manhattan (clutching my iPhone, of course). Funny thing is I’m actually not

745. Curaçao’s Swinging Old Lady: Queen Emma

Paris has the Eiffel Tower. New York has the Brooklyn Bridge. The Statue of Liberty. The Empire State Building. Beijing has the Great Wall. Cusco has the Machu Picchu. Agra has the Taj Mahal. San Francisco has the Golden Gate.

745. Curaçao’s Swinging Old Lady: Queen Emma

Paris has the Eiffel Tower. New York has the Brooklyn Bridge. The Statue of Liberty. The Empire State Building. Beijing has the Great Wall. Cusco has the Machu Picchu. Agra has the Taj Mahal. San Francisco has the Golden Gate.

746. Curaçao’s Colorful Clapboard Houses

Yuppies everywhere are wondering, ‘how much space do we really need to live comfortably? 300 sq feet? 500 sq feet? 1,000 sq feet?’ We live in a world where downsizing as opposed to super-sizing is a source of admiration, where small is beautiful

746. Curaçao’s Colorful Clapboard Houses

Yuppies everywhere are wondering, ‘how much space do we really need to live comfortably? 300 sq feet? 500 sq feet? 1,000 sq feet?’ We live in a world where downsizing as opposed to super-sizing is a source of admiration, where small is beautiful

758. Modernist Designer Rietveld in Curaçao

Widely considered an icon of the Modernist Movement in design and architecture, Gerrit Rietveld is a Dutch furniture designer and architect, best known for applying Dutch artistic movement De Stijl (1917-1931) tenets in designing his famous ‘Red and Blue Chair’

758. Modernist Designer Rietveld in Curaçao

Widely considered an icon of the Modernist Movement in design and architecture, Gerrit Rietveld is a Dutch furniture designer and architect, best known for applying Dutch artistic movement De Stijl (1917-1931) tenets in designing his famous ‘Red and Blue Chair’